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By Benetrends • December 26, 2014

Empowering Entrepreneurs Panel Of Experts

In a recent edition of the San Francisco Chronicle, Empowering Entrepreneurs, Benetrends President and CEO, Rocco Fiorentino was featured in a Panel of Experts, answering questions on Entrepreneurship and American Small Business.

Also featured is Kevin OLeary, known as "Mr. Wonderful," on "Shark Tank," a successful investor with a string of small business start-ups and good investment decisions behind him.

"Success. It’s what every entrepreneur wants." What does it take to be successful as an entrepreneur? According to Kevin O’Leary, “It takes a great idea, with a very motivated person driving the process—and it also takes a certain amount of serendipity and luck.”



What are the 3 most important qualities of a successful entrepreneur?


Lesa Mitchell: Vision, adaptability and fire in the belly

Matthew Brimer: Ill give you four: passion, vision, tenacity, and luck. Entrepreneurs need to be passionate about the problems they are attempting to solve, maintain a strong vision of the future what they want to create in the world, be able to overcome failure with relentless drive and tenacity, and create the conditions around them to get lucky as often as possible.

Mark Quinn: The three most important qualities of a successful entrepreneur are creativity, optimism, and persistence. He or she must be creative in seeing opportunities and identifying better approaches. Not everyone can be Steve Jobs, but a successful entrepreneur can spot a niche that could be better filled. They must be optimistic enough to believe that they can succeed. Unanticipated problems will get in the way, and this is when persistence is key.

Rocco Fiorentino: 1. An unwavering passion, commitment and dedication to lead others and allow them to be the best they can be. 2. The ability to be open minded and flexible enough to learn from others. 3. The courage to go from one mistake to the next, very enthusiastically while taking calculated risks.

Howard Leonhardt: A: Persistence. B. Ability to get people excited about your product. C. Love creating and continuously improving products to be the best in their class.

Why is it important for both consumers and large companies to foster small business and entrepreneurship?


Lesa Mitchell: The majority of net new jobs are created by firms less than five years old.

Matthew Brimer We live in a fast-changing world where technology is transforming almost every industry, and as such the way business is conducted is evolving quickly as well. Increasingly, small entrepreneurial teams with big ideas and an appetite for risk are the ones who are pushing the boundaries of industry. To truly innovate, you have to be able to move fast, you have to be willing to fail, and you have to pursue ideas in ways that other people havent before. Fostering this kind of entrepreneurial culture -- either within small startups or a large Fortune 100 companies -- is crucial to economic growth, innovation, and progress.

Mark Quinn: It is important for both consumers and large companies to foster small business and entrepreneurship because small business provide valuable local products and services. Larger companies need small business to fill the gaps that are not economically viable for them to fill, whether in their supply chain or to their customers. Small businesses are the vendors and suppliers for large business. Larger companies could not operate as effectively if they had to produce everything internally. For consumers, small businesses provide local support for the community. While you can grab a slice of pizza at a huge retailer, it is your neighborhood pizza joint that sponsors the Little League and participates in local chamber events.

Rocco Fiorentino: Small business drives the economy, creates entrepreneurs, creates jobs, and stimulates healthy competition. Every new "Grand Opening" sign provides opportunity for people and communities. This requires innovation and risk taking and is an essential, part of a nation’s ability to succeed in an ever changing and increasingly competitive global marketplace.

Howard Leonhardt: Small firms are the engine of innovation. Small firms are the engine of job creation. Small firms provide the most satisfying work experience for employees.

What are the 3 most important qualities of a successful entrepreneur?


Lesa Mitchell: Vision, adaptability and fire in the belly

Matthew Brimer: Ill give you four: passion, vision, tenacity, and luck. Entrepreneurs need to be passionate about the problems they are attempting to solve, maintain a strong vision of the future what they want to create in the world, be able to overcome failure with relentless drive and tenacity, and create the conditions around them to get lucky as often as possible.

Mark Quinn: The three most important qualities of a successful entrepreneur are creativity, optimism, and persistence. He or she must be creative in seeing opportunities and identifying better approaches. Not everyone can be Steve Jobs, but a successful entrepreneur can spot a niche that could be better filled. They must be optimistic enough to believe that they can succeed. Unanticipated problems will get in the way, and this is when persistence is key.

Rocco Fiorentino: 1. An unwavering passion, commitment and dedication to lead others and allow them to be the best they can be. 2. The ability to be open minded and flexible enough to learn from others. 3. The courage to go from one mistake to the next, very enthusiastically while taking calculated risks.

Howard Leonhardt: A: Persistence. B. Ability to get people excited about your product. C. Love creating and continuously improving products to be the best in their class.

Why is it important for both consumers and large companies to foster small business and entrepreneurship?


Lesa Mitchell: The majority of net new jobs are created by firms less than five years old.

Matthew Brimer We live in a fast-changing world where technology is transforming almost every industry, and as such the way business is conducted is evolving quickly as well. Increasingly, small entrepreneurial teams with big ideas and an appetite for risk are the ones who are pushing the boundaries of industry. To truly innovate, you have to be able to move fast, you have to be willing to fail, and you have to pursue ideas in ways that other people havent before. Fostering this kind of entrepreneurial culture -- either within small startups or a large Fortune 100 companies -- is crucial to economic growth, innovation, and progress.

Mark Quinn: It is important for both consumers and large companies to foster small business and entrepreneurship because small business provide valuable local products and services. Larger companies need small business to fill the gaps that are not economically viable for them to fill, whether in their supply chain or to their customers. Small businesses are the vendors and suppliers for large business. Larger companies could not operate as effectively if they had to produce everything internally. For consumers, small businesses provide local support for the community. While you can grab a slice of pizza at a huge retailer, it is your neighborhood pizza joint that sponsors the Little League and participates in local chamber events.

Rocco Fiorentino: Small business drives the economy, creates entrepreneurs, creates jobs, and stimulates healthy competition. Every new "Grand Opening" sign provides opportunity for people and communities. This requires innovation and risk taking and is an essential, part of a nation’s ability to succeed in an ever changing and increasingly competitive global marketplace.

Howard Leonhardt: Small firms are the engine of innovation. Small firms are the engine of job creation. Small firms provide the most satisfying work experience for employees.

How does the American entrepreneurship impact the rest of the world?


Lesa Mitchell: New firms and new jobs are the backbone of the American economy. Many firms launched in the US are global from a very early stage and can bring new services or products to the rest of the world.

Matthew Brimer: Entrepreneurship the American Dream boiled down to its most pure essence. Im continuing to see a global entrepreneurial culture coalesce across cities all over the world. Silicon Valley may have gotten things started, but a large and increasingly international group of people are realizing the importance of owning their own career paths, the value of turning their ideas into reality, and the positive impact they can have on their communities as entrepreneurs. Its very exciting.

Mark Quinn: America impacts the rest of the world’s entrepreneurs by providing a positive role model for a business-friendly setting. American entrepreneurs benefit from an established legal and financial environment – relatively low cost of entry to most ventures, a strong and structured financial service industry to supply debt and equity capital, and a strong legal and regulatory structure that protects their ventures.

Rocco Fiorentino: In today’s changing global economy, you cannot expect to be effective and successful in business unless you truly believe in yourself. The vital role of American entrepreneurship as key producers, employers and innovators, goes beyond its local, regional and national efforts and is increasingly recognized as an essential pillar in the global market.

Howard Leonhardt: Pushes innovation to a new level. Promotes capitalism and democracy by example. Demonstrates that a person from modest beginnings can achieve greatness by merit - inspirational.

http://us.mediaplanet.com/empowering-entrepreneurs/panel-of-experts